Looking for solutions: gender differences in relationship and parenting challenges among low-income, young parents.

TitleLooking for solutions: gender differences in relationship and parenting challenges among low-income, young parents.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsAlbritton, T., Angley M., Grandelski V., Hansen N., & Kershaw T.
JournalFam Process
Volume53
Issue4
Pagination686-701
Date Published2014 Dec
ISSN1545-5300
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Child, Child Rearing, Communication, Female, Focus Groups, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Male, Parenting, Parents, Poverty, Qualitative Research, Sex Factors, Tape Recording, Trust, Young Adult
Abstract

<p>The need for parenting and relationship strengthening programs is important among low-income minority parents where the burden of relational and parental stressors contributes to relationship dissolution. We examine these stressors among young parents. Data were collected from four focus groups (N = 35) with young parents. Data were audio-recorded and transcribed. Inductive coding was used to generate themes and codes, and analysis was completed using NVivo. Relationship and parenting challenges, values, and areas of need were the three major themes that emerged. Women's relationship challenges were family interference and unbalanced parenting, and men reported feeling disrespected and having limited finances. Common relationship challenges for women and men were family interference and unbalanced parenting. Both genders valued trust, communication, and honesty in relationships. Areas of need for women and men included: improving communication and understanding the impact of negative relationships on current relationships. Parenting challenges for women were unbalanced parenting, child safety, and feeling unprepared to parent; men reported limited finances. Both genders valued quality time with child to instill family morals. Areas of need for women and men included learning child discipline techniques and increasing knowledge about child development. Finally, women and men have relationship and parenting similarities and differences. Young parents are interested in learning how to improve relationships and co-parent to reduce relationship distress, which could reduce risk behaviors and improve child outcomes.</p>

DOI10.1111/famp.12088
Alternate JournalFam Process
PubMed ID24980026
PubMed Central IDPMC4373652
Grant ListP30 MH062294 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
5P30MH062294 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
T32 MH020031 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R34MH094354 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R34 MH094354 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
T32MH020031 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States